Travel the world, live a better life, be who you want to be

 

Travel The World, Live A Better Life, Be Who You Want To Be

 

Travel the world, live a better life, be who you want to be

 

Travel the world, live a better life, be who you want to be

 

Travel the world, Live a better life, Be who you want to be

 

Travel the world, live a better life, be who you want to be

 

Travel the world, live a better life, be who you want to be

 

Travel The World, Live A Better Life, Be Who You Want To Be

 

Travel The World, Live A Better Life, Be Who You Want To Be

 

Travel The World, Live A Better Life, Be Who You Want To Be

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1 week in Taiwan - Nomadic Travel

1 Week in Taiwan

By | Destinations, Nomadic-Adventures, Taiwan, Uncategorized | No Comments

1 Week in Taiwan

Taipei Itinerary

After spending 1 week in Taiwan I felt like I visited a more tropical and cultural cross between China and Japan. In Taiwan, the semi-tropical climate and environment provide beautiful beaches as well as breathtaking mountain ranges in Taroko National Park. There are literally so many things to do and see I was a little disappointed I wasn’t able to circumnavigate the entire island but the week I spent in Taipei, Keelung, Jiufen, and Hualien was incredible.

Taipei: Days 1-3

I naturally started my 1 week in Taiwan by traveling around the countries capital city of Taipei. This modern city is filled with many cultural wonders and many excellent places to eat like the night markets Shiling and Raohe. I spent two full days exploring the city before heading to Keelung and Jiufen. I would recommend staying for 3 days or more even I was able to see many of the recommended places to visit in Taipei but was a little rushed.

Taipei 101 Tower

I spent 3 days in Taipei total and started by visiting the famous Taipei 101 tower. The Taipei 101 tower was actually the tallest building in the world until the Burj Kalifa was built, and then subsequent others.

1 week in Taiwan - Nomadic Travel

Chiang Kai-Shek Memorial Hall

This blue and white octagonal temple was probably one of the coolest places I went to in Taipei. The memorial hall was created to commemorate the former president Chiang Kai-Shek and is definitely worth visiting.

1 week in taiwan - Nomadic Travel

With a huge courtyard connecting it to the local opera and art museum adjacent to the memorial hall.

Sun-Yat Sen Memorial

To commemorate the national founding father Dr. Sun Yat-Sen’s and his unparalleled morality, and revolutionary conducts they erected this Memorial with beautiful flowers and cultural decorations and regular performances.

1 week in taiwan - Nomadic Travel

Elephant Hill

After visiting the temples and tower I made my way back across town to the famous elephant hill viewpoint which is the best place to view the city skyline and sunsets. I was told by locals that this place usually has a long line all the way down the hill so it’s recommended to show up early. Fortunately for the weather forecast called for rain and I was also visiting during the week which resulted in much smaller crowds so I was able to get a great spot for Sunset.

1 week in taiwan - Nomadic Travel

Roahe and Shiling Night Markets

1 week in taiwan - Nomadic Travel

I spent my evenings at the famous Taipei night markets eating incredible exotic foods and other local fares. See my post here about Taipei street food.

Keelung: Day 4

Keelung is a historically rich city which is known for its Ghost Festival which is put on not only to honor their dead ancestors but also those who died during years of war and invasions.

Zhupu Altar

1 week in taiwan - nomadic travel

This impressive hilltop alter has a small but cool museum inside with figurines and other information about these ancient Chinese traditions.

1 week in taiwan - nomadic travel

I highly recommend hiking up the hill to this place and enjoying the classic architecture and panoramic views.

1 week in taiwan - nomadic travel

Keelung Miaoku Night Market

The Keelung Night Market was one of my favorites for the sheer variety of food available. After exploring the town and hiking up the hill head down to the pedestrian-only Miaoku Night Market. For more about Taiwanese food, check out this post, Taipei Food 101.

1 weekin taiwan - nomadic travel

There were definitely some different food options available here that I don’t remember seeing elsewhere. So if you don’t mind walking and eating then head down here and grab some snacks!

Jiufen: Day 5

Jiufen was on the top of my Taiwan Bucketlist and is also super popular with the Japanese. This place is teeming with character and unique charm. The views from this mountainside destination are also breathtaking, to say the least.

jiufen taiwan - nomadic travel

When you arrive it’s like practically going down the rabbit hole when you enter the narrow and crowded cobblestone alleyways of Jiufen Old Town and Shuqi Road. jiufen taiwan - nomadic travel 1

You’ll find that there’s a lot to take, I was literally looking left and right almost every step as new foods and souvenirs presented themselves. Many shops offer similarly good but when it comes to food there are things you must try like their specialty Taro Ball and Bean Dessert. Served either hot or cold, this is a must try the experience, plus the views aren’t bad either!

For more on planning your visit to Jiufen, check out my post Jiufen Day Trip.

Hualien/Taroko National Park: Days 6-8

I ended up heading east to visit Hualien and the incredible Taroko National Park. While there are nice beaches in Hualien and down south, having lived on an island in Thailand for so long I was yearning for some mountains and forests.

Taroko did not disappoint! The entire park was filled with massive forest-covered mountains, deep ravines, unique bridges and sketchy narrow mountain roads with falling rocks signs everywhere.toroko gorge itinerary - Nomadic Travel

I ended up renting a scooter for 600 Taiwan Dollars ($20 USD) and riding solo for about 7 hours high up into the mountains from the Eternal Spring Temple to the Swallow Gratto, then to Tanxiang and onto Baiyan Falls, this trip was unforgettable. For more on this, you can check out my Taroko National Park post.

1 Week in Taiwan Video

1 Week in Taiwan

Thanks for reading my “1 Week in Taiwan” blog post, please feel free to leave a comment below or on my Youtube. Follow my Instagram to keep up with my travels and subscribe to my blog for more travel tips and adventures.

taipei food - nomadic travel

Taipei Food 101

By | Destinations, Nomadic-Adventures, Taiwan, Uncategorized | No Comments

Taipei Food 101

Taipei food is literally the stuff of legends! I spent a few days in Taipei and was thoroughly impressed with the different styles of food and variety of interesting flavors available. I was able to visit two of the best night markets in Taipei as well as a third more low-key one with a couchsurfer that hosted me on my last night. Considering Shilin and Roahe night markets are only 9.5 km away from each other it’s very easy to visit both in one night if you have time.

taipei food - nomadic travel

If you’re into Dim Sum, you can expect to see several food carts offering traditional favorites like steamed shrimp dumplings, siu mai, barbecue pork buns, and various other popular options.

taipei food - nomadic travel

If you like seafood then don’t be surprised to see huge piles of prawns, crabs and other kinds of tasty cooked aquatic creatures.

taipei food - nomadic travel

One super popular style of food in Taiwan is called Oden, which is basically boiled meats and vegetables which you can hand pick and they prepare for you.

taipei food - nomadic travel

Some places even have a delicious gravy that they add to your dish after you make your selections. You can also see two popular options that are not offered at all Oden stands, one is the steamed egg soup on the top and the other is the black pigs blood and rice seen in the bottom right.

taipei food - nomadic travel

Since there is so much Japanese influence in Taiwan you can also expect to find some pretty amazing sushi too!

taipei food - nomadic travel

Whether you want crab, shrimp, clams or snails the seafood options are plentiful.

taipei food - nomadic travel

The semi-tropical beaches on the east side of the island provide a bounty of saltwater snacks to appease your appetite.

taipei food - nomadic travel

If you’re a vegetarian there are many options for you as well! From vegetable springrolls, easy snacks like edamame, boiled vegetables, and even stinky tofu!

taipei food - nomadic travel

Don’t be discouraged as you should have no problem finding something vegetarian as well.

stinky tofu taipeiIf you have a particularly sweet tooth then Taipei Food has you covered there too! One of the most interesting selections I saw and tried were these sweet pancake burrito style ice cream wraps served with ice cream and shaved candied peanuts and cilantro! If you feel like a new flavor sensation then try this, it will confuse your taste buds with the seemingly odd selection of ingredients that result in a rather delicious and unique treat!

taipei food - nomadic travel

These fried sweet potato balls are another excellent option for dessert.

taipei food - nomadic travelIf you’re not feeling super adventurous you can just have some cheesecake or other more normal baked goods.

taipei food - nomadic travel

Not all markets are created equal, Shiping being the most touristic location and Roahe being a little more lowkey, they both offer a first-time traveler many new experiences worth seeing.

roahe night marketOutside of the street markets, I would also recommend trying some Taiwanese hot pot! I was lucky enough to enjoy a traditional hot pot with the friends I made on Couchsurfing who hosted me for one night. This is a great way to spend time with family and friends.

taipei food - nomadic travel

If you want to know what the ingredients look like which they use for the hot pot broth then here it is! It’s an interesting combination of various spices and plants seen below.

taipei food - nomadic travel

One thing I would not recommend trying and is not for the faint of heart is a Century Egg!

taipei food - nomadic travel

This egg is very popular with Chinese and Taiwanese people but had me gagging. It was tough to swallow but I managed, although it is not recommended to eat it whole as I did! If you’re not up to the task but want to try something equally as popular and interesting then I would suggest the Tea Eggs.

taipei food - nomadic travel

I am not exaggerating when I say that Taiwan was probably the most impressive country I’ve eaten food in a while! With most of their food being inspired by the best combinations of Chinese and Japanese favorites, it’s no wonder Taiwan has grown a reputation as a popular food tourist spot. If you plan on visiting, then I would recommend getting out of your comfort zone and trying some new food here!

Taipei Food 101

Thanks for reading my “Taipei Food 101” blog post, please feel free to leave a comment below or on my Youtube. Follow my Instagram to keep up with my travels and subscribe to my blog for more travel tips and adventures.

Taroko Gorge Itinerary

Taroko Gorge Itinerary

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Taroko Gorge Itinerary

Taroko National Park in Hualien County Taiwan is an incredible outdoor experience with sketchy narrow roads winding through the mountainside along deep crevasses and semi-tropical forests. After renting a motorbike in Hualien for 600 Taiwan Dollars ($20 USD), I took Google Maps to Taroko National Park. The trip from Hualien to Taroko is about 45 minutes on a motorbike. My Taroko Gorge Itinerary followed a recommended course of intertwining mountainside attractions of Taiwan’s most beautiful countryside.

My trip started shortly after exiting the main road leading me to Guanchang Temple. This Temple has a lying down buddha statue and various other enlightened displays.

toroko gorge itinerary - Nomadic Travel

Don’t forget to cross the footbridge and make the steep hike up to the scenic belltower with amazing panoramic views of the valley.

toroko gorge itinerary - Nomadic Travel

My next stop was The Eternal Springs Temple, located a short distance from Guanchang through the mountain tunnel and to the left. When driving out here it’s especially important to wear a helmet, not only because its a very damp area with tunnels driving through waterfalls, but also due to the high risk of rock slides and falling rocks.

toroko gorge itinerary - Nomadic Travel

One thing you may notice on your way through the Park are the many styles of interesting bridges found throughout.

If you’re a bridge enthusiast then there are plenty of unique and interesting bridges to take pics.

toroko gorge itinerary - Nomadic Travel

From hundreds of meters below to smaller more majestic ones, the variation in styles was quite interesting.

toroko gorge itinerary - Nomadic Travel

I’m definitely not recommending taking pics like this because I would hate to end up as one of those dead travelers going for the best crazy Instagram pic. Although this was certainly not one of them, I recommend being super careful if you’re feeling a bit adventurous!

toroko gorge itinerary - Nomadic Travel

Swallow Gratto was the next spot after passing through many tunnels and coming to a clearing where you can then dismount and explore on foot. Be cautious of falling rocks when walking on the trail. Park authorities provide hard hats for visitors free of charge.

This gorge is a popular spot for long distance biking enthusiasts, many different groups can usually be seen trekking through the wilderness on their bikes. Talk about an incredible workout! Seasonally you can expect to see thousands of swallows.

toroko gorge itinerary - Nomadic Travel

The tunnel of 9 turns and its counterparts are another unique endeavor you’ll encounter on your journey through the breathtaking scenery.  The Grotto trail is interspersed with tunnels and overlooks the narrowest portion of Taroko Gorge where the river is most rapid.

toroko gorge itinerary - Nomadic Travel

Tanxiang was the next destination on the way to Baiyang Falls. This was a very peculiar deep mountain temple and town located well beyond the more popular Taroko tourist areas.

This is a great place to stop and admire a classic Buddhist temple topped with a hilltop pagoda.

toroko gorge itinerary - Nomadic Travel

Baiyang falls was the last stop on my deep motorbike ride into Taroko National Park but was well worth the effort.

toroko gorge itinerary - Nomadic Travel

At this point, it’s recommended to turn tail and head back to Hualien! At least, if that is where you are staying as I did. At the end of an exhausting and rewarding day like exploring Taroko, that sense of wander can easily become that much more appetizing.

Toroko Gorge Itinerary

Thanks for reading my “Toroko Gorge Itinerary” blog post, please feel free to leave a comment below or on my Youtube. Follow my Instagram to keep up with my travels and subscribe to my blog for more travel tips and adventures.

Jiufen Taiwan - Nomadic Travel

Jiufen Taiwan Day Trip

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Jiufen Taiwan Day Trip

One of my favorite places in Taiwan was the decommissioned gold mining town of Juifen. This popular mountainside holiday destination is a particular favorite with the Japanese. If you’re into Anime and have seen the movie Spirited Away then you’ll definitely want to come here because it’s where Hayao Miyazaki pulled much of his inspiration from.

Although the tourist popularity has nothing to do with the actual story of Spirited Away, many parts of the film do tear off some huge Jiufen chunks as inspiration for the characters and places that Miyazaki created. Jiufen Taiwan is fun for wandering around the old town full of small shops and food or head to the mines, or the mountain peak viewpoint!

Jiufen Taiwan Day Trip - Nomadic Nava

Jiufen Old Town

Founded during the Qing Dynasty, this small town was a relatively isolated village until the discovery of gold during the Japanese occupation in 1893. I spent a half day enjoying all the sites and smells there are to take in walking through the bustling business alleyways with interesting shops the entire way on either side.

Jiufen Taiwan - Nomadic TravelThe cobblestone steps of Shuqi Road is the recommended way to go from one end of the marketplace to the other. Boasting a wide selection of shops, cafes, and restaurants you can plan on spending at least a couple of hours if you really stop and take in the experience.

Jiufen Taiwan - Nomadic TravelThe souvenir shops and eateries that line both sides of the pedestrian-only pathways are home to Jiufens best-known specialty snack enjoyed either hot or cold. This tasty treat is a tapioca and sweet potato ball soup, it’s highly recommended! I had mine iced and will never forget it.

After reaching the top you should make your way down to the famous Jiufen A Mei Teahouse.

Jiufen Taiwan - Nomadic TravelA convenient way to visit Jiufen (as well as Shifen in Pingxi 平溪) is to take a shuttle bus from Ximen, leaving in the morning and returning before dinner.

Jiufen Taiwan - Nomadic TravelThis mountainside-hugging town faces the northwest, meaning you can expect some pretty spectacular scenery and sunsets on the northeast coast.

Jiufen Taiwan FoodJiufen is located in Ruifang District of New Taipei City. The town of Ruifang is a great place to begin your adventure in scenic Northern Taiwan. The train from Keelung costs only a few bucks and the bus up to Jiufen is even less expensive.

This place and Taiwan, in general, are so full of culture and history between the Taiwanese and Japanese which results in a variety of hybrid food options with something for everyone to enjoy. They even have a hilltop shop dedicated entirely to cats and cat merchandise!

Jiufen Taiwan Day Trip

Thanks for reading my “Jiufen Taiwan Day Trip” blog post, please feel free to leave a comment below or on my Youtube. Follow my Instagram to keep up with my travels and subscribe to my blog for more travel tips and adventures.

Digital Nomad Backpacking Asia Travel Blog

Digital Nomad Backpacking Asia

This is a travel blog dedicated to backpacking Asia tips and other countries I will visit. I am Nomadic Nava, a Digital Nomad and traveler from the United States. My adventurous spirit originated in Oregon, where I used to explore the outdoors as a kid with my grandparents in Central Oregon.

I love traveling and adventures and am using this as a way to share my experiences with anyone who cares to visit and see where I’ve been. I am happy to answer any questions about any countries I’ve been to or take advice for places I am planning on going. The world is a big place with so many places to go, let’s explore them together!

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How To Posts

bangkok to phuket cover

Bangkok to Phuket: Plane, Train, Bus, Boat, Hitchhike or Drive

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Bangkok to Phuket: Plane, Train, Bus, Boat, Hitchhike or Drive

Since moving to Phuket, Thailand and hosting people from all over the world thanks to Couchsurfing.com, I am often asked what the best way to get from Bangkok to Phuket is. Having lived in Thailand for almost two years now and traveling often, I have had the experience of most all the recommendations I am about to make. Your preferred form of transportation may not be the best option for somebody else traveling with a smaller budget or with more limited time constraints. I will, therefore, cover 6 different options to get you from Bangkok to Phuket from fast to free by either of these options: Plane, Train, Bus, Boat, Hitchhike or Driving.

Since Bangkok is the capital of Thailands and also where the largest international airport is Suvarnabhumi, it makes sense that many people begin their journey in there. If I were to recommend a particular path, I would say to spend 1 day in BKK then head to Chiang Mai, then south to Phuket and looping back up to Bangkok via Koh Samui and Phangan. The other option would be doing that in complete reverse order, you will then get to experience most of the key areas in Thailand. This does exclude equally incredible places like Ayutthaya or Chiang Rai.

So, How to get from Bangkok to Phuket?

Plane

bangkok to phuket by planeTaking the plane is by far the most convenient and efficient ways to travel from Bangkok to Phuket, and with low prices by Thai Lion and Air Asia. You can expect to fly most times of the day anywhere from 1000 baht or $20 USD and up depending on promotions and season. If you plan on doing this and have some time after spending a few days in Phuket then I would recommend taking the ferry from Krabi and island hopping in Samui and Phangan on your way back to BKK.

Boat

The ferry from Bangkok to Phuket is not the most luxurious or time effective ways to get there, but if you have the time, taking the ferry island hopping on your way can be the most fun. By the time you reach Koh Samui or Phangan, you will have tons of options for things to do like partying in Chaweng or going to a Full Moon Party. You can then even stop at Koh Tao on your way to Krabi before finally making it to Phuket. This route requires changing ferries on each island and the cost starts anywhere from 200 baht. Another option is to fly from BKK to Samui and then boating to Krabi.

Train

bangkok to phuket by train 1The Train travel time is approximately 12 hours and will cost you anywhere from 1000 baht up. This is a good option for someone who wants a sleeper room or may not feel comfortable taking the ferry out in the open water. You can conveniently check the travel timetables online via the SRT website.

Bus

bangkok to phuket by by bus

The cheapest way to get from Bangkok to Phuket is to take the bus which costs ฿650 – ฿800 and takes almost 14 hours. You’ll need to make your way to the South Bangkok  Terminal. There are several options, but I would recommend an express bus with wifi.

Hitchhike

Hitchhiking is always an option, especially in a super friendly country like Thailand. The only drawback is not everyone has a car so you may have to walk a long time before finally getting picked up by someone. If you don’t have too much to carry and are traveling solo you might even be able to score a ride on the back of someone’s bike.

Regardless of whether you are catching a ride from the pier in Krabi or all the way up north from Bangkok, this is by far the cheapest way to travel. Given the lack of control you have over your method of transportation in this scenario, you will need to expect your trip to take significantly longer, especially from BKK all the way down Surat Thani.

Drive

If you have a rideshare arranged or just get a wild hair up your butt and decide to drive your motorbike from BKK it can take you anywhere from 8+ hours by car and  3000 baht in gas. I wouldn’t recommend biking down as it can be quite dangerous and also exhausting but would be a relatively cheap option.

Bangkok to Phuket Transportation Comparisonbangkok to phuket chart

Bangkok To Phuket

Thanks for reading my “Bangkok to Phuket” blog post, please feel free to leave a comment below or on my Youtube. Follow my Instagram to keep up with my travels and subscribe to my blog for more travel tips and adventures.

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cheap bus tickets europe new

Flixbus Cheap Bus Tickets Europe

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Flixbus Cheap Bus Tickets Europe

Flixbus is the best place to find cheap bus tickets and travel basically anywhere in Europe and California USA. I found that the mobile app made scheduling my 1-month trip through 11 countries super convenient. I also work online as a Digital Nomad so I need to have wifi 24/7. which they provide. The buses also come equipped with USB connections and power outlets so you can charge devices on the road in between destinations. They’ve also started servicing most of California USA and if you’re a student you get a 10% discount!

Cheap Bus Tickets Europe

Benefit from comfortable, low-cost European bus travel

Jump on board one of their green buses and travel throughout Europe. Choose your route from our extensive network; with over 300,000 daily connections to over 2,000 destinations in 28 European countries, you really can explore Europe!

Planning a backpacking trip in Europe? Want to go on a last minute city break? Or a holiday with your family or friends? No problem at all! Flixbus will take you from A to B at an unbeatable price. With daily trips from France, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Germany, Italy, Czech Republic, Hungary, Croatia, and many more countries! Not to mention Sweden, Denmark, Luxembourg, Slovenia, and Austria – FlixBus provides the travel you want when you want it!

Getting you from A to B stress-free: thanks to real-time bus stop information, up-to-date and current bus schedules, helpful staff and friendly on-site bus drivers, you don’t need to worry about a thing. You can plan your bus trip and jump on board feeling completely relaxed.

Cheap Bus Tickets Europe

Thanks for reading my “Flixbus Cheap Bus Tickets Europe” blog post, please feel free to leave a comment below or on my Youtube. Follow my Instagram to keep up with my travels and subscribe to my blog for more travel tips and adventures.

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bangkok visa

Bangkok Visa Information: USA, UK, EU, AUS

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Bangkok Visa Information: USA, UK, EU, AUS

I just wanted to combine some information for foreign and domestic Bangkok Visa requirements and services to help make it easier for people to navigate and understand the process. The services listed below are based on Bangkok Buddy but there are other options. Below I have listed how to perform a Visa run in Bangkok to renew your visa and return to Thailand. I have also listed how to apply for a visa to USA, UK, EU, and AUS, for example, your Thai spouse wants to visit or go to your country.

BANGKOK VISA RUN TO BAN LAEM

REGISTRATION:

Bangkok Buddy staff will open registration at 4:20a at the ground floor courtyard fountain at Sukhumvit Plaza (Korean Plaza) located on the corner of Sukhumvit Soi 12 (just right of the 7-11).

Please have a passport, photo and visa run fee when you register. Our staff will assist in completing the forms and you will provide your signatures.

We will provide drink refreshments at this time until our spacious minivans arrive to pick up passengers.

DEPARTURE:

Departure is at 5:00a sharp so please arrive in advance to allow time for the registration process.

Driving time to the Ban Laem/Daung border is approximately 4 hours. We will stop halfway for a rest break. The entire ride will be without movies or music so you can relax and even sleep during the drive.

ARRIVAL AT BORDER & EXITING THAILAND:

Upon arrival at Ban Laem, the minivans will park next to the Thai Immigration building. Bangkok Buddy staff will guide the group to the immigration entrance where you will receive your Thai exit stamp.

Once exiting the Thai Immigration building (you are then officially in Daung, Cambodia), Bangkok Buddy staff will collect your passport, then obtain the Cambodia visa (a necessary part of the process) and return the passports to the group within 30 minutes. During this time, you are free to explore the nearby area shops.

EXITING DAUNG & RE-ENTERING THAILAND:

At approximately 10:00a, the group will gather to collect their passports from Bangkok Buddy staff next to the Thailand Immigration building. Bangkok Buddy staff will then direct you to walk to the Thailand Immigration re-entry area. Once clearing Immigration, the vans will be waiting directly outside to collect everyone.

RETURN TO BANGKOK:

Trip back to Bangkok will take approximately 4-5 hours with a rest stop on the way. Arrival time in Bangkok is typically at 4:00p. Passengers may elect to be dropped off at the following locations on the return:

Stop 1: Srinkarin Road | Stop 2: RCA | Stop 3: Pharam 9
Stop 4: MRT Petchaburi | Stop 5: Asoke BTS | Stop 6: Sukhumvit Soi 12

Visa Run Service Fees

Passport Country Fee Extension
UK,USA,Canada,France,Italy,Germany,Japan,
Australia,Spain,Portugal,Greece,Austria,Hungary,
Belgium,Czech Rep,Iceland,Ireland,Israel,Bulgaria,
Netherlands,Croatia,Denmark,Finland,Sweden,Norway,
Russia,Hong Kong,New Zealand,Poland,
Switzerland
2,500 THB 30 Days
Argentina,Brazil,Chile,Peru,South Korea 2,500 THB 90 Days
Indonesia,Singapore,Malaysia 1,400 THB 30 Days
Laos,Vietnam 2,000 THB 30 Days
Venezuela 2,500 THB Must have existing visa
 Philippines  1,600
THB
 30 Days
China,Ukraine,Nepal,India,Pakistan,Taiwan,
Egypt,Syria,Iran,Iraq, Kenya,Uruguay,Romania,
Cyprus,Maldives,Malta
Can’t Use Our Visa Run.
Can’t Cross Border in Ban Laem.
Countries Not Mentioned Contact Us

United States Visas

bangkok visaTourist Visa for the USA

B2 Tourist Visa for the United States of America

This visa allows the Thai citizen (or another country national) to enter the USA as a tourist for the length of the visa. The applicant must be sponsored by an American citizen and that person must declare that they will be responsible for the finances of the Thai national. A common use for this is to get a USA visa for a girlfriend or wife to visit as a tourist.

Bangkok Buddy has experience in successfully obtaining this kind of tourist visa for the United States and we handle all the paperwork, application and accompany the client to an interview at the USA consulate in Bangkok as needed.

Partner & Marriage Visa for the United States of America

Partner Visa (K-1 Fiancé(e) & K-3 Spouse)

This visa is for the fiancé(e) or spouse of an American citizen. This non-immigrant visa allows the partner to remain in the United States while the immigrant permanent partner visa (IR1 or CR1) is processed. The visa allows the visa holder to enter and exit the United States as often as they would like without the need for any additional visa. In the case of a Thai national, this would allow an unlimited stay in the USA for the time it takes for the permanent immigrant visa to be approved. In addition, we assist in the filings of the necessary I-129F & I-130 petitions required by Homeland Security.

Bangkok Buddy handles the entire application process including multiple visits to the American consulate, police headquarters for the applicant’s clearance, accompany applicant to the medical check ensuring a stress-free and passing a health check and all other aspects of the visa application process. Our direct contacts and staff help shorten the application approval process by avoiding unnecessary delays.

Schengen Visas

bangkok visaTourist Visa for Europe

This visa allows the Thai citizen (or another country national) to enter Europe as a tourist for the length of the visa. The applicant must be sponsored by a European citizen and that person must declare that they will be responsible for the finances of the Thai national. A common use for this is to get a Schengen visa for a girlfriend or wife to visit as a tourist.

Partner & Marriage Visa for Schengen Countries

Partner Visa

This visa is for the fiancé(e) or spouse of a European citizen. This non-immigrant visa allows the partner to remain in Europe while the immigrant permanent partner visa is processed. The visa allows the visa holder to enter and exit the European Union as often as they would like without the need for any additional visa. In the case of a Thai national, this would allow an unlimited stay in Europe for the time it takes for the permanent immigrant visa to be approved.

Australian Visas for Thai Partner

Tourist Visa for Australia

3-Month Tourist Visa for Australia

This visa allows the Thai citizen to enter Australia as a tourist for the length of the visa. The Thai citizen must be sponsored by an Australian citizen and that person must declare that they will be responsible for the finances of the Thai national as well as ensure the timely departure from Australia by the visa holder. A common use for this is to get an Australian visa for Thai girlfriend or wife to visit as a tourist.

Bangkok Buddy agents can get this visa submitted and approved within 10 days and accompany the applicant to the processing center for biometric fingerprint submission. Our agent acts on the clients’ behalf for all matters.

Partner & Marriage Visa for Australia

Partner Provisional Visa (Unmarried/Married) – Subclass 309

This visa is the necessary first-stage of permanent residency in Australia as a partner of an Australian citizen. This provisional visa allows the partner to remain in Australia while the second-stage permanent partner visa (subclass 100) is processed. The provisional visa allows the visa holder to enter and exit Australia as often as they would like without the need for any additional visa. In the case of a Thai national, this would allow an unlimited stay in Australia for the 2 years it takes for the second stage of the visa to be approved. The Thai national can be in Australia or Thailand when the provisional visa is upgraded to a permanent visa.

UK Visas

bangkok visa ukTourist Visa for the United Kingdom

This visa allows the Thai citizen (or another country national) to enter the UK as a tourist for the length of the visa. The applicant must be sponsored by a UK citizen and that person must declare that they will be responsible for the finances of the Thai national. A common use for this is to get a UK visa for a girlfriend or wife to visit as a tourist.

Partner & Marriage Visa for the United Kingdom

Partner Visa

This visa is for the fiancé(e) or spouse of a UK citizen. This non-immigrant visa allows the partner to remain in the United Kingdom while the immigrant permanent partner visa is processed. The visa allows the visa holder to enter and exit the UK as often as they would like without the need for any additional visa. In the case of a Thai national, this would allow an unlimited stay in the UK for the time it takes for the permanent immigrant visa to be approved.

Bangkok Visa Information

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